sábado, 30 de abril de 2011



1. The Folkswingers Featuring Glen Campbell - Black Mountain Rag (2:22)
2. The Kentucky Colonels Featuring Clarence And Roland White - John Henry (2:49)
3. Tut Taylor - Just Because (2:53)
4. The Folkswingers Featuring Glen Campbell - East Virginia (2:07)
5. Tut Taylor - Black Ridge Ramble (2:47)
6. The Stoneman Family Featuring Scott Stoneman - Fire On The Mountain (2:22)
7. The Kentucky Colonels Featuring Clarence And Roland White - Prisoner's Song (2:25)
8. Tut Taylor - Pickin' Flat (3:02)
9. The Folkswingers Featuring Glen Campbell - Gotta Travel On (2:13)
10. The Kentucky Colonels Featuring Clarence And Roland White - Wild Bill Jones (2:41)
11. The Kentucky Colonels Featuring Clarence And Roland White - Billy In The Low Ground (1:38)
12. The Kentucky Colonels Featuring Clarence And Roland White - Lee Highway (1:18)

VA – THE BEST AMERICAN FOLK BLUES FESTIVALS - Philips 9279 451 (The Netherlands)

VA – THE BEST AMERICAN FOLK BLUES FESTIVALS - Philips 9279 451 (The Netherlands)

Sleepy John Ester, Hammy Nixon, Buddy Guy, Lonesome Jimmy Lee, Freddie Below, Big Mama Thornton, Eddie Boyd, Muddy Waters, Otis Spann, Willie Dixon, Bill Stepney, Howlin’ Wolf, Sunnyland Slim, Hubert Sumlin, Clifton James, John Lee Hooker, Sonny Boy Williamson, Sonny Terry, Brownie McGhee, Roosevelt Sykes, Junior Wells, Otis Rush, Jack Eyers, Bukka White, Lightnin’ Hopkins
Live Recordings
Artist mentioned in file name = main vocalist (participating musicians details on back cover)

1. Sleepy John Ester - I'm Tearing Litttle Daddy (2:04)
2. Buddy Guy - First Time I Met The Blues (4:28)
3. Big Mama Thornton - Hound Dog (3:25)
4. Muddy Waters - Five Long Years (4:59)
5. Howlin' Wolf - Dust My Broom (5:56)
6. John Lee Hooker - King Of The World (3:36)
7. Sonny Boy Williamson - I'm Trying To Make London My Home (4:19)
8. Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee - Rock Island Line (3:13)
9. Roosevelt Sykes - Come On Back home (2:31)
10. Junior Wells - Vietnam Blues (4:18)
11. Bukka White - Aberdeen Mississippi Blues (2:57)
12. Lightnin' Hopkins - Ain't It A Pity (6:45)



Memphis Slim, T-Bone Walker, Willie Dixon, Jump Jackson, Sonny Terry, Brownie McGhee, John Lee Hooker, Shakey Jake Harris

Name between brackets = main performer, but the whole crew actually played on most tracks. Details On Back Cover.

1. Memphis Slim - We're Gonna Rock (3:00)
2. T-Bone Walker - I Wanna See My Baby (3:18)
3. T-Bone Walker - I'm In Love (3:57)
4. Sonny Terry - I'm Crazy 'Bout My Baby (3:26)
5. Memphis Slim - Stewball (4:17)
6. John Lee Hooker - Let's Make It Baby (4:35)
7. John Lee Hooker - Shake It Baby (4:10)
8. John Lee Hooker - The Right Time (6:17)
9. Shakey Jake - Hey Baby (2:18)
10. Shakey Jake - Love My Baby (3:07)
11. Brownie McGhee - Crying At The Station (4:05)
12. Memphis Slim - Bye Bye Baby (2:38)



Nothing new under the Sun!!!
For completists.

A1 - Born To Lose
A2 - Story Of A Broken Heart
A3 - Two Timin' Woman
A4 - Goodbye Little Darling
A5 - Port Of Lonely Hearts
A6 - I Forgot To Remember To Forget
B1 - Goodnight Irene
B2 - My Treasure
B3 - I Heard That Lonesome Whistle
B4 - Mean Eyed Cat
B5 - New Mexico

C1 - Sugartime
C2 - Life Goes On
C3 - Wreck Of The Old '97
C4 - Belshazah
C5 - You're My Baby
D1 - Fools Hall Of Fame
D2 - Blue Train
D3 - Country Boy
D4 - Wide Open Road
D5 - I Just Thought You'd Like To Know
D6 - Down The Street To 301



01 - Numbers Boogie
02 - Yancey Special
03 - Bouncing Ball Boogie
04 - Whop Whop
05 - Say, Little Girl
06 - Frustration Boogie
07 - Lazy Boy's Boogie
08 - Caldonia
09 - Hum-Drum Boogie
10 - Go, Boy, Go
11 - Baby Blues
12 - Broken Down Piano
13 - I'll Eat My Spinach
14 - Vooey, Vooey, Vay
15 - After School Blues
16 - Christmas Boogie



1. Alvin Smith (Al King) - I'm On My Way (2:39)
2. Little Joe Blue - Dirty Work Is Going On (2:46)
3. Sherwood Fleming - Good Woman (2:31)
4. Al King - The Winner (2:24)
5. T. Bone Walker Jr. - Midnight Bells Are Ringing (2:21)
6. Johnny Morissette - Brick (2:03)
7. Bob Reed (Ted Taylor) - I'm Gonna Change My Way Of Living (2:31)
8. Haskell Sadler - Bald Headed Woman (2:09)
9. Percy Mayfield - My Heart Is A Prison (2:13)
10. Tiny Powell - My Time After A While (3:15)
11. Johnny Morissette - Bad Shape (2:22)
12. Bob Reed (Ted Taylor) - I'm Leaving You (2:40)
13. Dale Cunningham - Won't You Think It Over (3:12)
14. Flash Terry - She's My Baby (2:45)
15. T. Bone Walker Jr. - That Empty Feeling (2:28)
16. Little Joe Blue - Me And My Woman (2:38)
17. Al King - Blue Shadows Falling (2:54)




A1 - You're Gonna Miss Me
A2 - Got Em' Bad
A3 - Troubles Don't Last
A4 - Your Letter
A5 - I Can't Explain
B1 - The Wrong Road
B2 - I Need You Baby
B3 - So Many Days
B4 - Down Hearted
B5 - Strange Things


VA – RHYTHM & BLUES FESTIVAL - Polydor Special 2343 037 (Holland 1971)

VA – RHYTHM & BLUES FESTIVAL - Polydor Special 2343 037 (Holland 1971)

1. Wynonie Harris - Bloodshot Eyes (2:40)
2. John Lee Hooker - Shake It Baby (live) (4:12)
3. Tiny Bradshaw - Bradshaw Boogie (2:28)
4. Freddie King - I'm On My Way To Atlanta (3:36)
5. Freddie King - Double Eyed Whammy (2:43)
6. Tiny Bradshaw - Walk That Mess (2:42)
7. Tiny Bradshaw - Breaking Up The House (2:41)
8. Wynonie Harris - Good Rockin' Tonight (2:32)
9. John Lee Hooker - Let's Make it Baby (live) (4:35)
10. Albert King - Travelin' To California (3:03)
11. Wynonie Harris - Lovin' Machine (2:27)
12. Memphis Slim - We're Gonna rock (3:00)




A1 - Hit, Git & Split
A2 - Don't Happen No More
A3 - Don't Think I Will
A4 - Do You Love Me
A5 - Down At Haydens
A6 - Nothing Seems Right
A7 - Mary Lou
B1 - I Smell A Rat
B2 - Lonesome Desert
B3 - Oochie Coochie
B4 - Here Comes Henry
B5 - Hot Dog
B6 - Well Baby
B7 - Rabbit On A Log




A1 - Long John
A2 - If Your Man Gets Busted
A3 - Do - Re - Mi
A4 - Milk Cow Blues
A5 - The Cuckoo
A6 - Black Mountain Blues
A7 - Poor Man
B1 - Solid Gone
B2 - When She Wants Good Lovin'
B3 - I'd Like To Know
B4 - Jelly Roll Baker
B5 - Windy Bill
B6 - The Panama Limited



1. Buddy Guy - This Is The End (Take 4, 5, 6 & 7) (7:25)
2. Buddy Guy - You Sure Can't Do (Rehearsal And Take 5, 6 & 7) (9:52)
3. Charles Clark & Sonny Boy - Row Your Boat (Take A & C) (4:49)
4. Koko Taylor - Like Heaven To Me (Track 6) (3:33)
5. Koko Taylor - Honkey Tonkey (Track 9 & 10) (3:54)
6. J.B. Lenore - I Sing 'um The Way I Feel (3:37)
7. J.B. Lenore - I Feel So Good (2:40)
8. Jesse Fortune - Heavy Heart Beat (3:31)
9. Jesse Fortune - You Got A Good Thing (2:41)
10. Jesse Fortune - Gods Gift To Man (3:11)

VARIOUS ARTISTS - Exile On Blues Street

Styles: Modern Electric Blues, Blues-Rock, Rock'n'Roll
Recorded: 2002
Released: 2003
Label: Telarc
File: mp3 @ 320 kbps
Size: 118.49 MB
Time: 50:16
Art: Full Covers

1. Ventilator Blues - 5:39-Lucky Peterson
2. All Down The Line - 4:24-Christine Ohlman
3. Rip This Joint - 3:30-Tommy Castro
4. Sweet Black Angel - 4:03-Otis & Cassie Taylor
5. Sweet Virginia - 6:17-Jeff Lang
6. Tumbling Dice - 4:17-Andrea Re & Colin James
7. Shake Your Hips - 6:08-Tab Benoit
8. Shine A Light - 5:53-Joe Lousi Walker
9. Happy - 3:20-Deborah Coleman
10. Rocks Off - 6:37-Jimmy Thackery

Lucky Peterson - Guitar, Organ, Vocals
Christine Ohlman - Vocals
Tommy Castro - Guitar, Vocals
Otis Taylor - Guitar, Vocals and Cassie Taylor - Backup Vocals
Jeff Lang - Guitar, Vocals
Andrea Re - Vocals
Colin James - Guitar
Tab Benoit - Guitar, Vocals
Joe Louis Walker - Guitar, Vocals
Deborah Coleman - Guitar, Vocals
Jimmy Thackery - Guitar, Vocals
Brian Stoltz - Guitar
Tommy Shannon - Bass; Chris Layton - Drums
Ryan Zoidis - Alto and Tenor Saxophone
David Noyes - Trombone
Notes: This disc is an integral part of a series Telarc is doing -- taking albums that were big sellers by prominent artists and having an innovative group of solid blues players do their interpretations of a variety of the songs from the original album. They have done this with the Beatles' White Album (calling it The Blues White Album) and Bob Dylan's Blonde on Blonde with good success, which will probably continue with this new interpretation of the Stones' 1972 vintage album. Telarc put together a dynamite "house" band, including Brian Stoltz (ex-Neville Brothers) on guitar and former Double Trouble rhythm section members Tommy Shannon and Chris Layton, and then pulled in many more celebrated artists to handle the leads. The Stones, who started out as a blues and R&B band, always maintained those roots; thus, many of the songs keep their original shape. This is a solid retooling of this classic Stones LP. Telarc has taken the original double disc and picked the songs the artists felt remained truest to their respective traditions and packaged it as a ten-song disc, complete with a cover notes that make it look the same. You probably won't be surprised by the tunes; however, there are some great takes here that will make the listener want to investigate some of the artists they used. Give a listen to Lucky Peterson's version of "Ventilator Blues," or maybe Jeff Lang's rendition of "Sweet Virginia." The contribution of the backing band is solid all the way through. A strong addition to this potentially wonderful series. ~~ from AMG.

Big Jack Johnson With the Cornlickers - Katrina

Bitrate: 320K/s
Time: 74:49
Size: 171.3 MB
Label: Big Jack Music
Styles: Delta blues, Louisiana blues
Year: 2009
Art: Front

[6:01] 1. Fourth of July
[3:44] 2. Stop Pushin' On Me
[6:22] 3. Katrina
[6:17] 4. Miss Statue of Liberty
[7:18] 5. Goin' Down to Big Red's
[2:24] 6. The Laughin' Blues
[8:13] 7. Po' Cow Boogie
[5:09] 8. Ain't Gonna Do It No More
[6:35] 9. Red Car
[6:02] 10. The Cryin' Blues
[7:22] 11. Gettin' Old Mister Ellis
[9:15] 12. It's All Gone

"Katrina" is Big Jack's most recent recording and is his self confessed musical "tribute to the land, people and spirit of Mississippi" to which Jack draws so much of his inspiration from.

From the joyful redemption party atmosphere of "Ain't Gonna Do It No More" to the traditional mandolin beauty of "Po' Cow Boogie" and "It's All Gone" to the low down lament of "Katrina" (the "meanest storm the world ever seen"..) to Lowell Fulsom's "Too Many Drivers" theme reworked as the relentless shuffle of "Red Car", this is one of Jack's strongest recordings to date! "The Cryin' Blues" and "The Laughin' Blues" explore both sides of human emotion while displaying the simple brilliance and range of the blues to convey those emotions. These two songs also illustrate Jack's uncanny ability to tap into and convey his emotions. They are a lesson in finding the blues in the everyday emotions of us all.

This new recording is his first that was recorded exactly as HE wanted-- not playing to the demands or directions of a record label but instead to his own vision. It is pure Big Jack Johnson and will have you jumping for joy!


Ray Sharpe - Texas Boogie Blues

The phrase "one-hit wonder" seems to have been invented for Texas blues and rockabilly artist Ray Sharpe. Best known for his 1959 dual market hit "Linda Lu," the singer-songwriter has parlayed interest in his early recordings into a solid following in domestic clubs and international festivals.
Described by the late producer Major Bill Smith as "the greatest white-sounding black dude ever," Sharpe's style encompasses all the best elements of early rock 'n' roll. As a singer-songwriter, he has mined Chuck Berry-type humor from the situations and wordplay in his songs. As a guitarist, he alternates snarling single note Albert King guitar bends with with twangy, free-flowing rockabilly. Moreover, after 40 years in the business, he manages to sound eternally fresh and youthful.

Got His Start in Fort Worth
Sharpe was born into a poor family split by divorce. One of his earliest memories is of living in a house without electricity or running water. The family's situation got marginally better when his mother relocated with her four children into a small apartment. A neighbor's radio first introduced Sharpe to the bluesy, big band sounds of T-Bone Walker, Pee Wee Crayton, and Lucky Millander. Yet, it was hearing such country-western icons as Jimmie Rodgers, Lefty Frizzell, and Hank Williams that inspired him to take up the guitar.
Young Sharpe worked as a janitor's assistant to earn the twenty-four dollars he needed to purchase his first guitar, a Stella. Once he became steady on the guitar, Sharpe played country music at high school talent shows, until he heard legendary bluesman Jimmy Reed's Vee Jay recording of "You Don't Have to Go." Reed's rudimentary style was easy to copy, and once the youngster learned it, he had all the building blocks he needed to make rock 'n' roll music.
The Sharpe family lived near a seedy bar called Cocoanut Grove. Undaunted by the bar's tough reputation, young Ray talked the owner into letting him play and sing for tips. He proved so popular that he was repeatedly asked back, and by the time he graduated from high school, music had become a lucrative alternative to training for a career as an interior decorator. Forming a band called Ray Sharpe and the Blues Wailers, he built up a good circuit of blues and rock gigs in and around the Dallas/Fort Worth area. The group briefly enjoyed a regular spot on KCUL radio, which catapulted them into one of the area's top nightspots, the Penguin Club.
Among Sharpe's early supporters were "Crying in the Chapel" tunesmith Artie Glenn and his son Darrel, who enjoyed a 1953 country hit with the song. Impressed by his Penguin Club performances, the Glenns offered Sharpe leftover time at Darrel Glenn's next session, in exchange for some guitar work. The deal yielded two strong demos, a rock 'n' roll instrumental titled "Presley" and a spirited R&B shuffle "That's The Way I Feel." The senior Glenn circulated the demo to music industry contacts, finally securing meaningful interest from independent producers Lester Sill and Lee Hazelwood.

"Linda Lu" Was a Big Hit
Two of the most important independent producers of their era, Hazelwood had already made a star of twangy-guitar master Duane Eddy, and the veteran Sill would eventually help Phil Spector form his ground-breaking Philles Records label. Together they saw possibilities in Sharpe, and brought him to Phoenix's Audio Sounds studios to re-cut "That's the Way I Feel," and a new song, "Oh My Baby's Gone." Today, this coupling is regarded by collectors and archivists as inspired Chuck Berry-styled rockabilly, blessed with the feel of Texas blues. However, in 1958 the Dot Records' subsidiary Hamilton Records was unable to sell the disc to the public.
Sill and Hazelwood still had faith in their young singer, and called him back to do the four-song session that was destined to jumpstart his career. Continuing in the style of his first release, Sharpe first recorded two self-penned originals, "Kewpie Doll" and "Monkey's Uncle," along with a sax-led shuffle version of the standard "Red Sails in the Sunset." He needed one more song to fill out the session.
"When I wrote 'Linda Lu' back in the 1950s, I didn't think much of it," Sharpe told Randy McNutt, author of We Wanna Boogie: The Illustrated History of the Rockabilly Movement. "A buddy of mine named Mike had asked me to write a song about his girlfriend, Linda, who used to come into the club to dance." He further recalled, "I wrote the song to rib her a little bit. You see she had a fascinating rear end, so to speak. When she danced, people watched." After playing the song in clubs, the singer forgot about it until his second recording session at Hamilton. "Then in the winter of 1958 I went to the Audio Sounds recording studio to make a record with Duane Eddy's band backing me up," Sharpe recalled. "My producer Lee Hazelwood, asked me if I had one more song to make four, and I was stuck. So I started playing 'Linda Lu" for him."
"Linda Lu," with it's half-stuttered phrasing and rhythmic guitar hook, was the perfect teen rocker. Coupled with "Red Sails in the Sunset," the song was leased to Jamie Records in Philadelphia. Initially the latter tune was considered the A-side, but once Dick Clark began playing "Linda Lu" on his American Bandstand TV program, there was no question as to which side was the hit. Eventually the record rose to number 46 on the pop charts and number eleven on the R&B charts. It might have garnered more success, but the Blues Wailers felt Sharpe would be abandoning them by playing with the customary local musicians on tour. As a result, without strong management to advise him, Sharpe bowed out of an East Coast package tour that would have surely spurred his record sales. Undeterred, producers Sill and Hazelwood capitalized on the record as best they could, replacing "Red Sails in the Sunset" with Sharpe's rocker "Monkey's Uncle," on which they held publishing rights. "Linda Lu" became something of a bar-band anthem in the United States, where it was covered by various acts, most notably blue-eyed soul rocker Wayne Cochran. In the United Kingdom, Johnny Kidd & the Pirates hit the British Top 50 with their version.

Returned to Texas Blues
Despite a strong rapport with producers Sill and Hazelwood, Sharpe was never able to conjure a follow-up hit to "Linda Lu." First-rate Chuck Berry-flavored teen rockers "Long John," "T.A. Blues," and "Gonna Let it Go This Time" were not successful. Eventually the singersongwriter's masters were shopped around to such small independent labels as Trey, Garex, and Gregmark, who reissued the artist's lone hit with an over-dubbed vocal chorus and called it "The New Linda Lu." This was also the title of a 1964 LP of Jamie sides and rock covers titled Welcome Back, Linda Lou. Although he was happy to finally have his own album out, the ploy didn't restore Sharpe's chart fortunes.
Sharpe returned to the Texas bar scene, where he earned a steady living playing his danceable mix of rock and blues. Occasionally, an opportunity with a big label would raise his hopes. A smart one-off single with Monument, "It's Too Cold," b/w "Let's Go, Let's Go, Let's Go," disappeared without a trace. The first of two raw and groovy soul singles with Atco, "Help Me Get the Feeling, Parts I & II," featured King Curtis's Orchestra and a young Jimi Hendrix on guitar. Best of all was the country soul number "Another Piece of the Puzzle," released by A&M in 1971. Pleading yet hopeful, the song should have signaled his mainstream reemergence, but didn't.
In an interview with Where Ya At, Sharpe tried to explain his career conundrum. "I wouldn't have called myself a blues singer but that's all I was doing in clubs. But they didn't record me because R&B was not happening in clubs. They were pursuing crossover artists, somebody that brought something different to the table. And the uniqueness with me is that I'm black but I sound white and play blues guitar. So they pitched me from one extreme to the other. I was never able to do some of the songs I wrote, like 'Justine' which had kind of a good funk/R&B thing to it."

Post: http://www.mediafire.com/?p5juk5w41r1b51o

Móveis Coloniais de Acajú – Adoro Couve (2010)

Pronto! Ficou pronto o nosso “couve” de maio. Experiência psicótica saindo do forno.
Conhecem Talking Heads? A banda de David Byrne, surgida em Nova Iorque em 1974. Pois então, escolhemos um grande hit deles, “Psycho Killer”.
Não demorou muito para chegarmos a um consenso de que cara dar à música: a deixaríamos completamente frenética. Pra isso, bebemos de fontes bem diferentes da original.
Alguém aí já assistiu ao “Mágico de Oz” ouvindo “The Dark Side Of The Moon”, do Pink Floyd? Dizem que é uma experiência sinestésica bem interessante. Eu nunca fiz isso, mas percebi que misturando “Psycho Killer” com o filme “Psicose”, do Hitchcock, o pessoal da banda ficou meio doido. Aliás, foi difícil segurar o Paulo. Tá certo que no nosso caso, os temas são parecidos. Acho que foi por isso que deu esse efeito na gente.
Bem, vejam, ouçam e tirem suas conclusões.

Cabugá – Porque Belém Demora! (2011)

A Cabugá, surgiu em 2010, na cidade de Olinda, Pernambuco, onde os integrantes do grupo olindense corriam para não se atrasar para o trabalho e pegar a lotação que os levavam mais rápido aos seus destinos, o ônibus “Jardim Brasil 2 Cruz Cabugá”. O veículo de transporte foi apenas uma das influências que o bairro trouxe ao grupo. As letras e a sonoridade possuem identidade com as experiências e músicas que propagavam das radiolas dos moradores do bairro. Em 2011 o grupo lança seu primeiro EP intitulado “Porque Belém Demora!”, o disco trafega entre o samba, o rock ´n´ roll sessentista, o brega, o funk e a música latina.
A banda desenvolve trabalhos no meio audiovisual, recentemente compõe a trilha sonora do curta-metragem Cerol exibido na Mostra Paralela do III Curta Taquary, 12ª Festival de Vídeo de Pernambuco, Programa Curta Pernambuco – TV Universitária e II Mostra Competitiva Olhares Digitais, onde recebeu várias premiações.
Em seu último projeto a Cabugá participou e produziu o Festival Jardim Sonoro Olinda, onde ocorreu a interação de música, cinema e artes plásticas, proporcionado a construção da primeira biblioteca da comunidade.

Pio Lobato – Café (2005)

Um universo próprio construído apenas a partir de timbres de guitarras é a marca do trabalho do músico paraense Pio Lobato, 33. Seus experimentos têm como pilar a força primal dos loops: a repetição é matriz de texturas criadas com camadas sobre camadas sonoras, unicamente com o uso do instrumento elétrico.
Sotaque brasileiro para a guitarra
O trabalho de Pio Lobato sempre buscou novas fronteiras, sotaques e experimentações voltados exclusivamente para a execução da guitarra elétrica. Ainda na década de 90, o músico de Belém já havia vasculhado a influência do choro na técnica original de guitarristas da região como Aldo Sena e Mestre Vieira de Barcarena, o maior difusor do gênero denominado guitarrada. Músico formado pela Universidade Federal do Pará, a partir de 1997 o guitarrista passou a integrar o grupo Cravo Carbono, um dos mais respeitados trabalhos de flerte entre o pop e os ritmos brasileiros estabelecidos na região. Também em busca paralela por um caminho mais próprio para suas composições instrumentais, Pio Lobato muniu-se de elementos que se tornariam patentes na sua música: colagens de bases pré-gravadas e manipuladas em computadores caseiros e muitos loops, construídos com a ajuda do echoplex – um original aparelho de delay eletrônico inventado por Mathias Grob, suico radicado na Bahia, que permite a um músico acompanhar a si mesmo em sessões ao vivo. O resultado, que pouco tem a ver com as timbragens e ritmos mais comuns à música eletrônica, pode ser conferido em Café, o primeiro disco solo de Pio Lobato. Recentemente, o compositor ainda foi incluído como uma das boas novidades da música de Belém na trilha sonora do novo longa-metragem de Cacá Diegues – Deus é Brasileiro (2003). A faixa que compõe o filme é Recado pra Lucio Maia, a mesma composição instrumental que ganhou destaque em coletânea nacional editada pelo projeto Itaú Cultural Música – Rumos e Vertentes, lançada em 2001.
O trabalho do músico ao lado do grupo Cravo Carbono também já havia sido mapeado em 2000 pelo documentário multimídia Música do Brasil, do antropólogo Hermano Vianna, bem como pela versão brasileira do Strictly Mundial, mostra do Fórum Europeu de Festivais realizada em 2001, em Salvador, paralelamente à programação do III Mercado Cultural Latino-Americano.

Karynna Spinelli – Morro de Samba (2010)

Karynna Spinelli, cantora, compositora, mãe, filha, mulher e pernambucana é fruto da noite, da boemia, cresceu e viveu no meio de grandes violonistas como Canhoto da Paraíba, Henrique Annes e Nuca, sentindo e vivendo ainda menina a certeza do canto e do encanto que a boa música trazia. Começou sua carreira em 2004, após seu contato com a música de terreiro e de rodas no Morro da Conceição, com o Grupo Afro Raízes de Quilombo, vem se dedicando com afinco ao samba de raiz e a todos os rítmos que permeiam esses ares . Integrou o grupo de samba Na Calçada cantando, compondo e tocando percussão. Nos últimos quatro anos, buscando as tendências do samba Afro e a valorizaçãoo dos batuques do candomblé, fez temporadas por diversas casas norturnas do Recife e passou a tocar fixo na Toca da Joana, em Casa Amarela durante 3 anos pra casa cheia e um público fiel que acompanha a cantora por onde ela passa.

Num trabalho paralelo, Karynna também fez parte do grupo Sambadelas, formado unicamente por mulheres. à frente dos dois grupos, Karynna se apresentou em vários eventos, entre eles, no Espaço Usina no Poço da Panela, no Marco Zero no Recife das Águas, no Pátio de São Pedro, na abertura do Carnaval 2008 dos Blocos Tô Cumendo Nada e Joana de Nóis Todos, No Circo Maluco Beleza no encerramento da Roda de Boteco, na Pitombeira dos 4 Cantos em Olinda, Coreto em Samba e Choro em 2008, Carnaval Multicultural em Recife e Olinda em 2009 e 2010, Ciclo Natalino da Prefeitura da cidade do Recife, Samba da Aurora, ao lado de Dicró e Nelson Rufino, Gigantes do Samba cantando ao lado de Monarco, lançamento do Espetáculo”E o que mais aflore de Gonzaga Leal. Fundadora e Presidenta do Clube do Samba de Recife consegue reunir mensalmente sambistas e artistas da cidade unidos pela música e pela comunidade do Morro da Conceição. Karynna produziu e apresentou em abril de 2008 o show “Salve Clara Guerreira” em homenagem aos 25 anos de morte de Clara Nunes, que contou com a presença do instrumentista e compositor Jorge Simas sendo reapresentado em janeiro de 2009 na Livraria Cultura e em Agosto de 2010 na Casa de Seu Jorge. É acompanhada no projeto SAMBA D’OURO & OUTRAS GIRAS pelo percussionista Lucas dos Prazeres e o Cavaquinista Daniel Coímbra.
Lançado há seis meses, Morro de Samba chega a marca de 4 Mil cópias vendidas, mesmo sem gravadora Karynna só tem motivos pra comemorar, com produção totalmente independente, depois de lançar seu CD em Recife no Espaço Muda e no Rio de Janeiro no ”Centro Cultural Carioca” cantou na Portela, na Cidade do Samba e no pagode do Arlindo Cruz junto com o próprio. De volta a Recife Karynna Spinelli fez Show no Reveillon no Palco do Pólo Pina ( Pela Prefeitura de Recife) abrindo a noite pra Martinho da Vila e recebendo Démostenes do Pouca Chinfra, Tunico e Juliana Ferreira ( Sambistas cariocas, filhos de Martinho da Vila), Karynna fez uma temporada de 4 Shows em Olinda com participação de Nena Queiroga, Alessandra Leão, Adryana BB, André Rio, Jorge Riba, Carlos Ferrera ( Dibontom) e As Conxitas e recebeu três sambistas nacionais no Palco do Clube do Samba ( Wilson das Neves, Nilze Carvalho e Moacyr Luz) promovendo a interação entre os sambistas das duas cidades. No Carnaval participou do Projeto “Orquestra Samba Frevo” do Maestro Forró e comandando o CLUBE DO SAMBA DE RECIFE abriu a Noite de Samba do Carnaval 2011 – Marco Zero, para Martinália e Jorge Aragão, recebendo em seu palco os grandes nomes do samba de Pernambuco, Além dos Shows em Olinda no Pólo do Samba, em Águas Belas e Triunfo ( Interior de Pernambuco – Pela EMPETUR), Casa da Globo Juntamente com Fafá de Belém e Gustavo Travassos e a participação no encerramento do Carnaval do Recife a convite do Maestro Spock. Karynna Spinelli se prepara agora para lançar seu Cd em São Paulo e para gravação do seu primeiro DVD em Setembro.
Karynna mora no samba.
Esta moradia o envolve em cuidados especiais que refletem no resultado deste primoroso trabalho.
Aqui o Samba e suas vertentes recebem um tratamento harmônico, sofisticado, moderno, rico e simples.
Sua voz firme e alegre é cortejada por elegantes arranjos de percussão feitos por Lucas dos Prazeres,
isso faz nascer no Morro da Conceição uma roda de samba com refinado sotaque afro-pernambucano,
um convite para entrar nesta roda e viver essa alegria.  (Naná Vasconcelos.)
Web da Karynna

Jorginho Maneiro e a K’Padocia (2011)

Agora, com o vocalista e guitarrista Jorge Romão assumindo o pseudônimo de Jorginho Maneiro, a banda K´Padocia vem homenagear em seu novo trabalho, ´´EP 12 de Março“ alguns compositores pernambucanos: Otto, Lula Côrtes, Devotos, Cordel do Fogo Encantado e Alceu Valença, foram relidos rítmica e melodicamente.
Este trabalho é fruto do repertório da banda, que mescla suas composições, com releituras de nomes nacionais.

Criolo Doido – Nó na Orelha (2010)

‘No Na Orelha’, é o segundo álbum do cantor paulista Criolo. O disco vai além do hip-hop do passado de MC (no qual assinava Criolo Doido) e traz canções que transitam entre samba, soul e reggae.
Produzido por Daniel Ganjaman e Marcelo Cabral, o álbum está repleto de músicas feitas para dar “sarrafadas na cabeça de quem ouve”, segundo o cantor, em entrevista ao jornal ‘Folha de São Paulo’. Em cada uma delas, Criolo expõe sua alma. Toda a composição se amarra em imagens poéticas e ataques críticos com rimas crônicas – muitas vezes irônicas – e quem escuta navega junto.
‘Bogotá’, a música que abre o disco, é um funk dançante, seguida pelo single ‘Subirusdoistiozin’, que possui aquele “para-rá- pa-pá” de qualidade instrumental, com teclados e metais de ponta, na narrativa realística do nosso mundão.
A balada soul de ‘Não Existe Amor em SP’ mostra que Criolo encanta quando canta sutil, no apelo emocionado de um morador da cidade. Na faixa ‘Sucrilhos’, o compositor avisa: “Fia, eu odeio explicar gíria”. Em ‘Grajauex’, o rap dá um nó no ouvido dos fãs com tantos ‘ex’ ritmados por uma batida de game ao fundo.
No todo, Criolo faz uma ode à São Paulo, manda lembrança a sua família e deixa os fãs boquiabertos, já que para ele “cantar rap nunca foi pra homem fraco”!.

Sandra Belê – EncarnadoAzul (2011)

Sandra Belê carrega em seu repertório o sentido de lembranças, saudades, emoções e tempos de outrora. A sua vivência com reisados, pastoris, aboios, benditos, romances, forrós tem lhe proporcionado uma interpretação singular, da qual surge a forte identidade que carrega na voz quando interpreta as encantadoras obras do cancioneiro nordestino. Zabelê, cidade do Cariri paraibano, foi seu berço de ouro, lá nasceu, cresceu e aprendeu a admirar as paisagens, os cheiros e os sons duma terra árida, porém fértil para as mais variadas formas de sobrevivência.
Entre os anos de 2004 e 2005 Sandra Belê gravou o Cd Nordeste Valente, o primeiro de sua carreira. Um ano depois encontrava-se na cidade de Taperoá/PB, onde participou como atriz-cantora das gravações da microssérie global A Pedra do Reino do escritor Ariano Suassuna. Com o Cd Nordeste Valente ela participou da coletânea de músicas da Pedra do Reino, organizada pela Som Livre, e da coletânea do Projeto Esquina Brasil, organizada pelo SEBRAE, entre outros. Tem estado presente no mercado cultural da cidade do Recife/PE, Campina Grande/PB, João Pessoa/PB e na região do Cariri Paraibano, através de eventos populares e institucionais. No ano de 2008 Sandra Belê participou do projeto Sete Notas do Sesc Centro de Campina Grande, interpretando o compositor cajazeirense chamado Zé do Norte , surgindo assim o show “Sandra Belê canta Zé do Norte. No mês de agosto, também no projeto Sete Notas a cantora realizou o show “João do Vale – O Poeta do Povo”.
No ano de 2009 lançou o CD intitulado “SE INCOMODE NÃO”, que apresenta o universo romântico do povo nordestino através dos ritmos do xote, arrasta-pé, xaxado, baião e forró é repleto de músicas para dançar, como as tradicionalmente presentes nos repertórios de Luiz Gonzaga, Alcimar Monteiro, Trio Nordestino, Marinês, Gordurinha, Três do Nordeste, Dominguinhos, Jackson do Pandeiro e também no repertório dos novos intérpretes e compositores nordestinos como Marrom Brasileiro, Ranjel Júnior, Carlos Zens, Ilmar Cavalcante, Antônio Costa, Xico Bezerra e muitos outros.
Entre os anos de 2010 e 2011, a cantora gravou seu terceiro CD, intitulado “EncarnadoAzul”, onde o mesmo está saindo da fábrica trazendo lembranças de pastoris ao som de violão, sanfona, bateria, trompete, percussões de efeito, viola, cavaquinho, vocais e um show de contemporaneidade.
Luíz Gonzaga, João do Vale, Gordurinha, João do Vale, Zé do Norte, Dominguinhos, Benedito do Rojão, Sivuca, Marinês, Gonzaguinha, Reisados e Pastoris são algumas das infinitas luzes que fazem com que Sandra Belê cante um passado cheio de amores, desamores e imagens que nos remetem à infâncias brincadas, sofridas, vividas.

Marcelo Camelo - Toque Dela (2011)


01. A noite
02. Ôô
03. Tudo o que você quiser
04. Acostumar
05. Pretinha
06. Três dias
07. Pra te acalmar
08. Vermelho
09. Despedida
10. Meu amor é teu

Keith Jarrett - The Art Of Improvisation (2005)

01. Essentially an Improviser
02. Three is Not a Crowd
03. Small Hands
04. A Potential Star
05. Moments to Echo
06. Solo
07. Invader in the Ranks
08. Sounds and Pulses
09. Musical Seduction
10. The European Group
11. Sacrifices
12. Epilogue

Bonus Features:
- The Keith Jarrett Trio, Live in Concert perform "Butch and Butch
- Extra interviews with Keith Jarrett, Gary Peacock and Jack DeJohnette





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Pink Floyd - Live In Venice July 15,1989 (2006) [DVD+2CD]

Out of all the video Pink Floyd material, this title is my favorite. No silly effects and no dang interviews. Just the concert. They where in top form and did a super job. Excellent.
The 2CD+DVD is packed in cardboard boxing with high quality polygraphy inside and outside the cover. Packed like original vinyl. Beautyful made band info. Every single CD is in nice paper pocket. Very special edition. For real collectors.
This title was producded from a TV special shown through out Europe back in 1989. Flim & audio quality is not up the current DVD standards. Two channel sound & low res film. A typical clean production for those old VHS players & analog TV sets. Still, it's a nice clean title that I rate about 9 out of 10 considering it's age. It's a 4:3 video flim.


CD 1:
01. Shine You Crazy Diamond (part 1)
02. Learning To Fly
03. Yet Another Movie
04. Round And Around
05. Sorrow
06. The Dogs Of War
07. On The Turning Away
08. Time

CD 2:
09. The Great Gig In The Sky
10. Wish You Were Here
11. Money
12. Another Brick In The Wall (part 2)
13. Comfortably Numb
14. Run Like Hell


01. Shine You Crazy Diamond (part 1)
02. Learning To Fly
03. Yet Another Movie
04. Round And Around
05. Sorrow
06. The Dogs Of War
07. On The Turning Away
08. Time
09. The Great Gig In The Sky
10. Wish You Were Here
11. Money
12. Another Brick In The Wall (part 2)
13. Comfortably Numb
14. Run Like Hell

David Gilmour - Lead guitars and Lead vocals
Nick Mason - Drums and Percussion
Richard Wright - Keyboards and Vocals
Tim Renwick - Guitars
Gary Wallis - Percussion
Jon Carin - Keyboards, Synthesizers and Vocals
Guy Pratt - Bass and Vocals
Scott Page - Saxophones
Rachel Fury, Durga McBroom and Lorelei McBroom - Backing Vocals

Download Pink Floyd - Live In Venice:

CD 1 | CD 2
part01 | part02 | part03 | part04 | part05 | part06 | part07 | part08 | part09 | part10 | part11

CD 1 | CD 2
part01 | part02 | part03 | part04 | part05 | part06 | part07 | part08 | part09 | part10 | part11

Various Artists - A-Z: Kitty, Daisy & Lewis - The Roots of Rock 'n' Roll

Styles: Roots Rock, Rockabilly, Boogie-Woogie, Western Swing, Jump Blues, Country & Western
Review by Maddy Costa: Impeccably put together by precocious teen siblings - Kitty, Daisy and Lewis - this compilation gleefully rummages through the 1940s and 50s with such joy that both aficionados and those who wouldn't know boogie-woogie from rockabilly should be equally entertained. The high number of novelties - notably Louis Jordan's School Days and the Western Melody Makers' Who Put the Turtle in Myrtle's Girdle - heightens the impression that the trio were rocking to this stuff in the cot. But that innocence is balanced by rude sauce and sass: Rufus Thomas's Bear Cat, a hiss-spit riposte to Hound Dog, or the Swallows' It Ain't the Meat, a glorious celebration of the female body, whatever its shape. The siblings' own cover of a 1940s song, called Ooo Wee, is so authentic that only the demotic London accent gives its modernity away.

Disc: 1
01. Albert Ammons - Boogie Woogie Stomp
02. Rufus Thomas - Bear Cat
03. Spade Cooley - Oklahoma Stomp
04. Floyd Dixon - Hey Bartender
05. The Flamingos - The Hot Guitar
06. Little Junior's Blue Flames - Jump Children
07. Oscar McLollie - Feelin' Good
08. Oscar McLollie - Hey Lolly Lolly
09. The Swallows - It Ain't the Meat
10. Louis Jordan - School Days
11. Sid King - Sag Drag & Fall
12. Pete Lewis - Louisiana Shop
13. Miller-Olsen Combo - Twist All Wrong
Time: 34:28 Min

Disc: 2
01. Willie Nix - Baker Shop Boogie
02. Kitty, Daisy & Lewis - Ooo Wee
03. Earl Hines & His Orchestra - Piano Man
04. Andy Starr - Dig Them Squeaky Shoes
05. Louis Jordan - Run Joe
06. Tex Williams & His Western Caravan - Smoke! Smoke! Smoke! (That Cigarette)
07. Blanche Thomas - You Ain't So Such a Much
08. Unknown - Grandma's Rockin'
09. The Platters - Voo-Vee-Ah-Bee
10. The Western Melody Makers - Who Put the Turtle in My Myrtle's Girdle
11. Johnny Carroll & The Hot Rocks - Hot Rock
12. Roy Brown - Rock-A-Bye Baby
13. Bob Zurke - Honky Tonk Train Blues
Time: 34:02 Min

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Elvis Presley - Elvis is Back! (Legacy Edition) (2011)

RCA Records 2011 | Rock'n'Roll
Disc 1

01. Make Me Know It
02. Fever
03. The Girl Of My Best Friend
04. I Will Be Home Again
05. Dirty, Dirty Feeling
06. Thrill Of Your Love
07. Soldier Boy
08. Such A Night
09. It Feels So Right
10. Girl Next Door Went A’Walking
11. Like A Baby
12. Reconsider Baby
13. Stuck On You
14. Fame And Fortune
15. It’s Now Or Never
16. A Mess Of Blues
17. Are You Lonesome Tonight?
18. I Gotta Know
19. Surrender

Disc 2

01. There’s Always Me
02. Give Me The Right
03. It’s A Sin
04. Sentimental Me
05. Starting Today
06. Gently
07. I’m Coming Home
08. In Your Arms
09. Put The Blame On Me
10. Judy
11. I Want You With Me
12. I Slipped, I Stumbled, I Fell
13. I Feel So Bad
14. (Marie’s The Name) His Latest Flame
15. Little Sister
16. Good Luck Charm
17. Anything That’s Part Of You

Download from filesonic

CD 01 | CD 02

Download from fileserve

CD 01 | CD 02